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Written by Laetitia BenadoronMonday, June 14, 2021on

The $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan, passed by Congress to help America recover from COVID-19, includes $5 billion in farm debt relief for producers who are members of socially disadvantaged groups that have historically been subject to discrimination and underserved by U.S. government programs. Black/African American , American Indian, Alaskan Native, Latinx, Asian American, and Pacific Islander producers who have farm loans through the Farm Service Agency (FSA) or private lenders with FSA guarantees are eligible for relief.

Socially disadvantaged farmers tend to operate…

Written by ManualMigratoronMonday, June 14, 2021onCCOF Foundation, Future Organic Farmers, Future Organic Farmers - Vocational & Higher Ed, Future Organic Farmers program
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BradyKazmier

Interested in getting involved in organic agriculture? Brady Kazmier, Future Organic Farmers grantee, urges, “Do it. Dive in and don’t look back. Education in organic agriculture is extremely extensive, and the possibilities are near endless. The amount of good you can do is astonishing. We can bring upon a revolution to be better to our planet through organic agriculture.” And that is exactly what Kazmier intends to do.

Kazmier grew up in Montana, and while he was surrounded by rangeland and agriculture, his family worked in the tech industry, so the food system wasn’t a career…

Written by Guest BloggeronMonday, June 14, 2021oneducation, general organic, grower, help and tips

Savvy food makers who specialize in jarring up tasty seasonal goods can be a huge help when you come back from market with hundreds of pounds of leftover tomatoes. Processing excess produce not only keeps it out of the compost pile but also saves the money and hard work that went into growing and picking the crop. With some forethought, you can turn leftover produce into a shelf-stable product that can be sold all winter and beyond.

What Crops to Use

What crop are you known for growing? Do you have a following for growing the sweetest dry-farmed tomatoes or the crunchiest…

Written by Laetitia BenadoronMonday, June 14, 2021onfunding, hardship

The $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan, passed by Congress to help America recover from COVID-19, includes $5 billion in farm debt relief for producers who are members of socially disadvantaged groups that have historically been subject to discrimination and underserved by U.S. government programs. Black/African American , American Indian, Alaskan Native, Latinx, Asian American, and Pacific Islander producers who have farm loans through the Farm Service Agency (FSA) or private lenders with FSA guarantees are eligible for relief.

Socially disadvantaged farmers tend to operate…

Written by Jane SoobyonMonday, June 7, 2021onadvocacy, policy

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) is accepting public comment through June 15 on the funding rules for its new Conservation Agriculture Planning Grant Program.  Please consider making a comment using the points outlined below.

An outcome of CCOF’s advocacy for CDFA support for organic farmers in its Climate Smart Agriculture programs, this new program received $20 million in Governor Gavin Newsom’s May revision of the state budget.

As proposed, the planning grant program would offer funding for 11 Conservation Activity Plans (CAPs) developed by the…

Written by Guest BloggeronMonday, June 7, 2021on

Whether they milk cows or raise livestock for meat, ongoing drought conditions in the state have forced ranchers and dairy farmers to downsize their herds as they face soaring costs to sustain their animals.

In regions such as Marin and Sonoma counties, where farmers and ranchers rely heavily on pasture and natural rainfall to grow feed crops and provide drinking water for their livestock, the duration of the current dry spell has been particularly hard.

The U.S. Drought Monitor has classified large swaths of the region as under "exceptional drought"—the highest level of…

Written by Shawna RodgersonMonday, June 7, 2021onCCOF Foundation
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Forager-Project-Cashew-Milk-Cropped

Stephen Williamson, co-Founder of Forager Project, recently spoke with Michelle Courtright, agriculture and food writer based out of Austin, Texas. In the interview with Courtright, Williamson says, “I think people should embrace the idea that they might want to really think about where their food comes from, how it’s made, and who are the people behind it.” We couldn’t agree more!

Plant-based food company Forager Project recently invested $10,000 in CCOF’s Future Organic Farmer program. A full 100 percent of this donation will support the next generation of organic producers, who…

Written by Shawna RodgersonMonday, June 7, 2021onCCOF Foundation
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TandA_acquires_Green-City-Growers_web

CCOF Foundation supporter Tanimura & Antle recently announced the exciting acquisition of Green City Growers, a Certified B Corp corporation aimed at providing customers with the tools, infrastructure, and education necessary to grow organic produce at home. Despite the geographic distance between the two companies’ headquarters in Salinas, California and Boston, Massachusetts, Tanimura & Antle and Green City Growers couldn’t be closer in their shared values.

Both Tanimura & Antle and Green City Growers alike seek to educate communities on the origins of their food. In…

Written by onTuesday, June 1, 2021onCCOF Foundation, Future Organic Farmers, Future Organic Farmers - Vocational & Higher Ed, Future Organic Farmers program
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Celsa Coronel_Farming

After 13 years of working in the fields processing lettuce, Celsa Coronel decided it was time for a change. While training for a position in an office setting, Coronel saw a presentation about ALBA, the Agriculture and Land-Based Training Association and knew that a farming path was more aligned with her passions and interests: “When I saw this opportunity, and they explained to me how everything worked, I said, ‘That is right: Here you can give it your all because it’s for you, for your future, for your family, and to help people.’ And so, I changed [back] to agriculture, because that was…

Written by Shawna RodgersonTuesday, June 1, 2021onCCOF Foundation
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clif-bar-family-foundation-on-farm

The Clif Bar Family Foundation, a longtime Champion-level supporter of the CCOF Foundation’s Future Organic Farmer program, is no stranger to organic advocacy. Those familiar with Clif Bar know of its many investments in the future of the industry. From launching the University of California’s first-ever organic research institute at UC Davis to supporting first responders amid the tragic wildfire seasons of recent years, Clif Bar is far beyond an average food company. One could argue that they are setting the standard for corporate philanthropy, using business as a medium for changing our…

Written by Shawna RodgersonTuesday, June 1, 2021onCCOF Foundation
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yemenis of the san qoaquin

Like many in the CCOF-certified farming community, Sunview Vineyards is a multigenerational, family-run operation. As a longtime supporter of the CCOF Foundation, Sunview is committed to reinvesting resources into future organic producers. Sunview’s founder, Marko Zaninovich, emigrated from Yugoslavia to the United States and began Sunview Vineyards. Over the years, many of Sunview’s farm professionals have come from Mexico, but a small portion came from Yemen, fleeing political turmoil in their homeland.

Nearly a decade ago, PBS aired a mini-documentary called The Last Harvest:…

Written by Laetitia BenadoronMonday, May 24, 2021onadvocacy, policy
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Organic For Everyone
Eating organic food should not be a privilege; organic is for everyone.

Yet today, widespread economic inequality prevents many families from accessing organic. Income inequality is at its highest in California’s history, with a pay disparity almost double today what it was in 1980.

At the same time that communities struggle to afford food, California’s farmers struggle to stay in business. Farmers today receive only 18 cents for every dollar that consumers spend on food, compared to 40 years ago when farmers received 40 cents for each dollar spent. A majority of California’s…

Written by Shawna RodgersonMonday, May 24, 2021onCCOF Foundation
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ETC

In 2020, the CCOF Foundation was one of the first nonprofits to receive a grant from Seth Goldman’s new snack company, Eat the Change. Eat the Change Impact (ETC Impact) is the charitable arm of the company. The CCOF Foundation was chosen as a grant recipient because of our research project, the Roadmap to an Organic California, which laid out the scientific benefits of organic agriculture and opportunities for California to implement organic to address our community, economic, and environmental health needs. The CCOF Foundation was grateful to join the other ETC Impact grantees to move…

Written by Shawna RodgersonMonday, May 24, 2021onCCOF Foundation
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Lundberg

If you were to ask most farmers why they got into the business of agriculture, few would tell you it’s because they wanted to use cellphones, video cameras, and social media to promote the sale of their organic produce. But times are changing rapidly, and as the next generation of organic farmers and producers begin to take the reins from many retiring farmers, so shift the tools used to tell the story the origins of our food.  

CCOF Foundation Champion supporter and longtime organic industry leader Lundberg Family Farms educates their consumers from the farmers’ market to the…

Written by Guest BloggeronMonday, May 17, 2021onCCOF Foundation, hardship
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sunflowers

Assisting Organic Producers in Need Since 2007

If you or an organic producer you know has experienced hardship during the 2021 calendar year, we encourage you to apply for financial assistance through the Bricmont Hardship Assistance Fund. The application deadline is midnight on May 28, 2021.

Throughout the nation, farmers are experiencing severe economic losses as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, extreme weather patterns, an increase in the duration and number of natural disasters, and financial challenges. Now more than ever, organic producers need access to…