FAQs by prospective

Yes you can. Retail stores are certified by department such as produce, meat, bulk foods, prepared foods, etc. Any or all departments can be certified.

If you are certifying a prepared food section – such as a bakery, deli, salad bar, or juice or coffee bar – you may choose to certify only selected items instead of all items. As with all other types of certification where both organic... Read more

No, retail stores are not required to be certified. But they can choose to be in order to provide assurance to customers and go the extra mile to ensure that organic product integrity is maintained.

Retail food establishments (retailers) do not need to be certified in order to sell organic agricultural products. However, they are responsible for verifying and maintaining the organic... Read more

Yes, "Certified Transitional" is a status granted to growers who are transitioning their crops from conventional to organic. To achieve “Certified Transitional” status, operations must be inspected and demonstrate compliance with all requirements for certified organic production except the three year transition time. To sell a crop as “Certified Transitional,” the grower must wait until one... Read more

Yes you can. You will need to maintain the organic integrity of the ingredients and products by preventing commingling and contamination of organic products with any prohibited materials such as sanitizers, pesticides, and non-organic products or ingredients. Additionally, you will need to clearly distinguish organic products from non-organic products to provide accurate information to your... Read more

The main benefit of organic certification for retail food stores is that consumers have confidence that the organic integrity of the products they buy extend from the seeds used to grow their food to their shopping basket. Consumers want to know the store where they shop cares enough to go the extra mile to provide them that assurance of organic integrity.

Apply for certification of... Read more

A wild crop is a plant or portion of a plant that is collected or harvested from a site that is not maintained under cultivation or other agricultural management. This means that in order for a crop to be considered wild it cannot be watered, fed or otherwise managed. In order to certify a wild crop as organic it must be harvested in a manner that ensures that such harvesting or gathering will... Read more

Before the Inspection: Organic System Plan (OSP): This is the central document of organic certification. The OSP must be completed before the inspection. The inspector will compare your OSP with their observations, interview, and audit of records. An excellent OSP includes all applicable sections and thoroughly answered questions, with all required attachments (labels, parcel maps, land history... Read more

Organic inspections confirm that your operation meets the NOP standards and regulations both before you are certified and every year after for as long as you remain certified. Inspectors do this by confirming that what you say in your application, called an Organic System Plan (OSP), is what you are doing in practice. A CCOF-qualified inspector will conduct the inspection in an efficient... Read more